Senior Settlements

By: Max Bellamy

Sometimes senior citizens no longer need their policies which they had taken in their youth. They may not be able to pay the premiums anymore, or they may need the cash for some other purpose. Some years ago, the only options to get rid of unwanted policies were to cash them in at their surrender value, or, worse still, to allow them to lapse. Both these methods caused a serious loss to the policyholder.

But now there is a way out of unwanted policies. Unwanted policies can be settled for a cash value, which is higher than their surrender value at that moment. Settlement of a policy involves a third party which buys the policy from the senior citizen and becomes liable for all future premiums. The original policyholder, i.e., the senior citizen, gets a lump sum amount in cash.

Senior Policy Settlements are becoming hugely popular because of the direct cash compensation that they provide. Senior citizens can use the cash to invest in a more lucrative policy, such as a long-term care policy, or use it in some business which could be more profitable. Some seniors may want the cash to just fulfill some lifelong desire. Whatever be the purpose, the cash advantage is what is driving millions of senior citizens toward Senior Policy Settlements.

Life insurance settlements have spawned a number of financial organizations specializing in settling senior insurance policies. Actually, senior life settlement is an offshoot of the industry which caters to settling policies of terminally ill patients. Senior Settlements are provided to adults who have crossed the age of 65 years. There is also a minimum limit on the policy value to be eligible for settlement. Both these qualifications differ from state to state.

Broker companies handle the paperwork and introduce the policy in the market to be discerned by interested buyers. Actual bids are drawn by interested parties and the policyholder gets the liberty to choose the highest bid among those received.

Retirement
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