Dog Training - A complete guide

By: contentwriter
Like all human beings the dogs also live in communities and their very behavior makes their relationship much closer to human being. By this the man wants to make them as mannered and helpful as the other human beings can so this need leads to an environment where they can be trained. â??The dogâ??s training is a combination of positive reinforcement using verbal and physical praise and playtime, and negative consequences for inappropriate behavior, usually a verbal reprimand. It is the process of teaching a dog to exhibit certain desired behaviors in specific circumstances.â?? Fundamentally, dog training is about communication. From the human perspective the handler is communicating to the dog what behaviors are correct, desired, or preferred in what circumstances. The handler must communicate what behaviors will give the dog the most satisfaction to his natural instincts and emotions.
The hardest part of this process is communicating with your dog in a humane way that he understands.

The training usually starts when the puppies are 6 to 8 weeks of age; a skilled group of volunteers observe their temperaments, desire to please and willingness to learn. When they are 8 to 9 weeks old, they are placed in the homes of youth and adult puppy raisers to experience life in a family atmosphere and learn basic obedience and social skills. When the pups are 14 to 18 months old, they are returned to senior schools for formal training with licensed instructors. For approximately four to five months, every dog receives daily training on campus and in the surrounding community.

â?? Teaching a dog basic obedience commands (part of obedience training)
â?? Teaching a dog to perform tricks casually or for circus acts
â?? Teaching a guide dog to lead the blind
â?? Teaching a rescue dog to find victims of a disaster
â?? Helping a hunting dog learn to perform its instinctive behaviors at appropriate times.
â?? Therapy Dog refers to a dog trained to provide affection and comfort to people in hospitals, retirement homes, nursing homes, mental institutions, schools, and stressful situations such as disaster areas.

The specific behaviors taught in each case are different, but the underlying principles are similar. Professional "dog trainers" usually do not train the dogs, but actually train the owners on how to train their own dogs. Although it is also possible to send a dog away to a training school, the owner still must at some point learn what the dog has learned and how to use and reinforce the techniques and then provide them to specific sect of people for different services which can be even official security.

Top Searches on
Pets
 • 
 • 
 • 
 • 
 • 
 • 
 • 
 • 
 • 
 • 
 • 
 • 
 • 
 • 
 • 
 • 
 • 
 • 
 • 
 • 

» More on Pets