An Introduction to Boat Trailers

By: Chris Anto

In the most basic terms, a boat trailer is a wheeled frame made to transport a boat across land by towing it behind any vehicle. The frame could be basic for all small boats, but larger boats may require more multifaceted designs. The boat's weight, total length, width, center of gravity, engines and many more other factors decides the most excellent boat trailer model. For example, a sail boat requires a special boat trailer because of its deep keel and high winch stand.

A boat trailer might have a single, double or even triple axle, based on its rated weight capacity. While a small boat trailer sports a guide hoist to haul the boat on to the trailer, bigger models have one- or two-speed mechanical winches. Most frames are made of a welded steel manufacture, which features weather proof paint. Lights and axles are totally submersible for launching.

Powerboats are normally purchased with custom trailers particularly for the boat, right down to the matching paint scheme. A boat trailer might also come with custom chrome wheels, electronic brakes, which work in racing bike with the vehicle's brakes, and as well the other option accessories.

The "bed" of the boat trailer comprises of one or more sets of "bunks" or as well treated by wood planks covered with tough indoor and outdoor material. The bunks are placed lengthwise on either side of the trailer, biased inward. The hull rests alongside these bunks. A boat trailer could be at times with adjustable bunks, but most have motionless bunks. The shape of the hull decides the necessary placement of the bunks.

The boat trailer joins to a car or truck by way of a locking "coupler" placed at the end of the tow bar. The coupler slides down over the ball catch on the vehicle. When the boat trailer is not been used, the coupler could also be fitted with an optional flat lip coupler lock that would protect the boat trailer from theft by making it not possible to drop the coupler on to a ball hitch.

Before towing a boat, make sure that the winch and coupler both have been locked and the boat is now secured. The electrical harness needs to be connected and all lights needs to work properly. Routinely confirm tire pressure and tread wear. Some boat trailers offer a frame-mounted spare tire. For those that do not, this is an alteration worth considering.

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