Depression Strategy

By: Pattrick Jhonson

The changes produced by a high-protein diet are small, but tyrosine supplements can have significant effects. Initial tests using tyrosine to treat depressed patients have been encouraging. A higher-protein meal plan and/or one to three grams of tyrosine taken daily at spaced intervals may be the answer for many depressed people. Taking the tyrosine with meals avoids mild stomach upset (due to tyrosine's acidity). Never take more than three grams (3,000 milligrams) without the supervision of your doctor. Obviously, there are two very different treatments advised here regarding depression. The tryptophan route appears to work in those people with depression coupled with carbohydrate cravings. Tyrosine also works on depression in other types of people, and can be effective in the treatment of lethargy (the lack of interest in doing anything) in people over the age of 40. If there is no clear-cut way of determining which route to take, experimenting for a month with one method and then a month with the other will clearly show the ?way.

Toxic reactions to cheese and other tyramine-containing foods are likely to occur in patients taking antidepressants in the monoamine oxidase (MAO) inhibitor class. Attacks are characterized by transient high blood pressure, headaches, palpitations, nausea, and vomiting.

the severity of the attacks has been shown to have a relationship to the level of tyramine in particular foods. The ingested tyramine is usually converted in the liver to an inactive form through the action of monoamine oxidase (MAO). However, drugs in the MAO inhibitor class leave tyramine in its active form. As a result, the tyramine remains in the blood and can increase blood pressure to dangerous levels. Reactions usually occur within a half hour of the ingestion of the offending food or drink. other foods that contain dopa or dopamine have similar effects. Both tyramine and dopamine enter the general circulation and release nore?pinephrine from nerve endings in the body. This increases blood norepinephrine above normal levels, but since MAO inhibitors are being taken, it cannot be degraded by the body and so stays high enough to increase blood pressure. Other antidepressant drugs, such as amphetamines, also act as MAO inhibitors and, when combined with foods containing tyramine and dopamine, can precipitate severe or even lethal side effects.

Raisins and avocados should also be avoided, because the v contain dopamine, which has the same effect as tyramine Alcohol should not be consumed by people taking MAG inhibitors. as these drugs prevent the body from detoxifying it at the normal rate and the alcohol has a more pronounced effect, making one drunk more easilv. Since these drugs upset the digestive system, they should always be taken with food or milk. If You Take Antidepressants, Watch Your Weight It is likely that you will find that your appetite increases while you are taking antidepressants, with a resultant weight gain. If you do gain weight, you should make a special effort to cut back on your caloric intake. Strategy If you have already gained weight, you should cut back on the carbohydrate component of your diet, remembering that a reason?able and moderate weight-reduction program should aim at a manage?able loss of one to two pounds per week. Cutting back by 500 calories per day, for a weekly total of 3,500 calories, will result in a loss of one pound per week regardless of your present weight. Two eggs and a milk shake, one and one-half cups of tuna salad, four ounces of a roast, three frankfurters, two cups of ice cream, or two pieces of cheesecake represent approximately 500 calories each.

Depression
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