Getting your Data Back: Server Data Recovery

By: James Walsh

The need for transportable data is the reason behind the birth of what is a familiar setup today - the LAN and WAN - networks of computers that are interconnected. This ensures that data within the group is secure, better managed, have optimum space usage and ease of sharing. One need not go to an overseas office physically to look at the computer there, the interconnected network allows access to all those who belong to that network.

What are Servers?

But how are these networks managed? There would be chaos if hundreds of computers had to be connected physically through wires, and the cables would not cross over oceans anyway. That is why we have servers - systems whose job is to manage a network of computers. Servers may be doing all types of activities, or they may be dedicated to only one kind of job. A file server, for example, stores files containing data belonging to a particular network. Microsoft's Exchange Server is dedicated, for example, to handling only business mails and other means of business communication such as official IM accounts. Multiprocessor servers handle several tasks at the same time, keeping the internet connected, storing data, managing mailboxes etc. These are complicated programmes rather than one computer, and have much the same function on a massive scale as our humble OS on any home pc.

Uses of Servers

Servers were created to manage data better and make it faster and safer for all users. All of us deal with servers in some format or the other. Some of the most common utilities provided by servers are:

  • Providing access to the internet. Most of us use a server provided by a company that manages the web connectivity, availability and services for us. This makes it cheap and easy for us to stay connected through the net.


  • Managing official communication. Almost all offices run on a LAN server now, connecting all the computers and managing them centrally. This makes the office infrastructure cheaper, simpler, safer and better managed.


  • Allowing remote access. As illustrated in the example above, one need not travel to Germany to look at the computer there; one can access it right here in the UK through a server that connects both systems.


  • Everyday services such as ATMs and travel bookings as provided by the respective companies are all dependent on servers for the services rendered.


  • Entertainment has made its foray in the area of servers too, with movies being distributed remotely over a common server now.


Types of Servers

The list given above is only the tip of an iceberg. Servers are of many kinds, and new ones are being created or customised to meet client demands everyday. Some of the types of servers that are very familiar to us are listed below:

  • Chat Servers: All of us are using net chat rooms, instant messengers and all kinds of live forum activities. These are all thanks due to servers.


  • Fax Servers: Again, a common feature of most offices, and a blessed relief from extremely high telephone bills but, nevertheless, a source of obtaining document hard copies.


  • FTP Servers: One of the oldest formats around, these ensure secure file transfers between interconnected systems.


  • Group Servers: Be it the internet or the office intranet, linking several computers in a virtual space is done by these servers.


Hard Disks in Servers

Hard disks are household goods now, and the definition of disks inside servers has been affected by this changed scenario. A 60GB disk can also act as a server now. But the most usual format is the RAID - an array of disks - that is discussed below.

What is RAID?

RAID stands for Redundant Array of Independent Disks, and is self-explanatory. It is literally a 'stack' of two or more disks with a specialised disk manager to run it. RAIDs are rated on a scale of 1 to 10 to measure efficiency and utility. Besides, there are also RAID 53 and RAID 0+1 that are very powerful arrays.

Data Loss from Server Drives

Data loss from servers can happen through natural disasters, virus and hacker attacks, logical failures, disk crashes, electrocution and human errors or mishandling.

Solutions for RAID Data Loss

RAID data loss can be attended to by only the best data recovery professionals. Any company that has experienced a RAID data loss (or is on the brink of one) must immediately contact an established data recovery company.


Top Searches on
Data Recovery
 • 
 • 
 • 
 • 
 • 
 • 
 • 
 • 
 • 
 • 
 • 
 • 
 • 
 • 
 • 
 • 
 • 
 • 
 • 
 • 

» More on Data Recovery
 



Share this article :
Click to see more related articles