Taking Steps to Avoid Bankruptcy

By: Jon Arnold

If you are buried under tons of debt, filing for bankruptcy may seem like the easy way out. However, just because it is the easy way out, it doesn't mean that bankruptcy is the best solution. In fact, filing for bankruptcy can put you under far deeper financial trouble than you previously were. This is why it's best to avoid bankruptcy at all costs.

Here are a few reasons why bankruptcy can be seriously bad news:

1. Bankruptcy does more damage to your credit record than you would like to imagine. For instance, once you've filed for bankruptcy, not only will it stay on your credit record for seven to ten years, it will also make it incredibly complicated for you to be approved for loans and credit in those years. So even if creditors do give you limited credit, you will need to give lengthy explanations as to why you applied for bankruptcy and you will also be looking at substantially higher interest rates and credit fees.

2. Although property liquidation isn't a part of all types of bankruptcy, many of the eight types of bankruptcy in the USA do call for some form of repossession of assets. For instance, if the banks discover any items that aren't necessary for living, they will seize these assets in order to pay off your debts and bankruptcy expenses. And, if you file for complete bankruptcy, then be prepared to give up even your home or cars.

3. Despite what people might say, bankruptcy isn't the end of all your problems, it is in fact the beginning of a whole world of financial difficulties. The financial problems associated with bankruptcy include closure of your credit and bank accounts, being fired from your job or conclusion of your business as well as inability to obtain credit.

Thus, if you want to avoid years of financial hardship, you can keep in mind the following steps to avoid bankruptcy:

1. Debt Consolidation: With the high number of bankruptcy cases in the country, many debt consolidation companies have now come up, which help you to successfully manage your debts. For instance, these companies help you decide which debt to pay towards each month while also giving you a reasonable time frame in which to pay off your debts. This gives the debtor a much better perspective on how to go about paying off even the biggest debts without feeling overwhelmed.

2. Eliminate potential debt traps: These days, plastic is accepted everywhere and with easy access to credit accounts, it is easy to find yourself neck deep in debt before you even know it. This is why; one of the best ways to avoid bankruptcy is to get rid of the credit to begin with. So cut up that credit card and call the credit company to cancel your credit card account. Limit your expenditures to your savings account and if you can't afford your expenses out of that, then you probably shouldn't spend as much. Perhaps the simplest way to manage debt is to plan a monthly budget where you allocate your income to paying of your debt bills first and then to your other expenses. If you have a problem with financial management skills, attend some courses to learn those skills, many of which are given free.

3. Contact Debt Companies: It's quite common for people to simply ignore or hide from debt companies who continually send bills or make calls. Sadly, these people don't understand that if you aren't able to pay of your debts, it is the debt companies who can provide them relief in the form of different payment plans. Oftentimes many mortgage companies, student loan corporations and credit card companies allow for a fair amount of leniency when it come to recovering debt money. These forbearances come in the form of reduction of the loan amount or deferment of installments to alleviate some of the pressure during times of financial crisis. But the key is communications, and you need to be the one to initiate that communication.

Remember the aforementioned points to avoid bankruptcy and you should be able to find your way to financial security without too many problems.

Bankruptcy
 • 
 • 
 • 
 • 
 • 
 • 
 • 
 • 
 • 
 • 
 • 
 • 
 • 
 • 
 • 
 • 
 • 
 • 
 • 
 • 

» More on Bankruptcy