Analysis of Mallinâ Rouge

By: Olivia Hunt

The department store offers an image of service. Customers are served and treated like kings and queens. Sales representatives assist their customers just so they spend their time there. On the contrary, the supermarket displays an image of independence. There are no assistants thus a customer has to help himself/herself with the shopping spree. The element in highlight here is self-service. It is associated not only with the saving of running costs, but also with the unprecedented idea of the food store as an attractive and comfortable place for the consumer to enjoy. The shopper can roam around the supermarket, picking the items he/she needs without being disturbed by any assistants. It gives the customer more control over exactly what he/she buys, with nothing, and no one, between her and the goods, she can carry through her plan from home to store and back again.

A department store has its own festivities such as seasonal sales and gimmicks. They need to be as inviting as they can be so as to attract customers and buyers. And such gimmicks are their only way to do so. Supermarkets don’t have the luxury to create such grand pretensions. With the fact that food is a daily necessity, people would buy them, regardless of how the supermarket is presented. Outside the malls, there are parking lots, which are not exempt from interpretation. Some parking areas are buildings specifically for parking purposes only. These are for the public.? But when a customer parks and takes a space, there is a sense of ownership that seems to be appropriate; they would go thinking, “That’s my spot!" The parking lot is indeed a private space and not public—but it belongs to the mall, not the mall goer.

Malls that are located far from main avenues and highways provide a getaway from chaos, and hustle and bustle of city life. This does two things: it entices people to come by providing a sense of uniqueness, yet keeps out those who might not have the desired spending power – those who cannot afford a car, riff-raff, the homeless, teens who need to be driven, bus riders. But this may not be so applicable to malls in the Philippines, because if anything, they are right smack in the middle of the cities and thoroughfares to make them accessible.

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