Non-Interview Plan

By: Paul Megan

If you've been in the job market you know about interviewing. But how about the non-interview plan?
It's an exciting 21st Century breakthrough that puts you in control of the process.

Most of us are under the impression that going on an interview is a passive process. By that I mean that we approach it with the attitude, "they invited me in, and so I'll answer all their questions as best I can." Sadly, that's the reason most people never get invited back.

Back in the day (20th Century) you could take this passive approach. It went right along with a traditional job search. You know mail or email dozens of resume to employers and agencies. Post your resume on some job websites like Monster or HotJobs. And then wait for a response.

Once in a great while you got an invitation to come in for an interview. But it's always a screening session with a HR staffer. Never with the boss or decision-maker. More often than not, you'll get a TNT (thanks but no thanks) letter a few days later. So you start the whole procedure all over. More resumes.

Of course, this can take you weeks and months. And lots of frustration. The good news is there's a better way. It's called the "alternative job search system." One of the featured highlights of this system is a revolutionary approach to interviewing. In fact, it's called the non-interview plan.

Using the quick and highly effective "career partners" alternative technique, you bypass the tiresome resume/screening interview routine and approach a decision-maker directly. That's where the non-interview plan excels.

Here's how it works.

You approach a first meeting with the person who could be your next boss with a carefully crafted plan. Essentially it means being prepared to establish rapport and chemistry as a first step. The reason this is so critical to your success is based on job search studies. We know that a prospective employer will never offer you a job unless he/she feels personally comfortable with you. And it's your responsibility to build that relationship as quickly as possible.

Next, you can't let your rapport drift into a question and answer session. Again, you must be prepared to take the lead by demonstrating that you've taken the time to learn something relevant about the organization's and the decision-maker's needs. You do this by establishing a dialog . . . a give-and -take exchange of relevant ideas. Your goal is to see if there's a fit.

When you're able to speak face-to-face with a decision-maker . . . and you do it in a way that establishes a dialog rather than a traditional interview, you can dramatically move the odds in your favor of getting an early job offer!

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