How to Answer Job Interview Questions

By: Fae Cheska Esperas

Probably the most dreaded part of every job application is the interview. To feel butterflies in your stomach is actually common whenever you are headed for an interview, but this is something you must get over with. People think of job interviews as "grilling sessions". In reality, interviews are just like any other getting-to-know-you conversation. It's just that your answers determine if you get that job you're applying for. So make sure you give them what they are looking for.

Here are some kinds of questions you should prepare for in a job interview:

1. The "Tell us a little more about yourself" question

Basically the interviewer wants to know about your capacities, so better tell him or her about your strengths and skills.

2. Closed questions

These are questions answerable by "yes" or "no". You are also required to show technical expertise for them to assess.

3. The "What if..." questions

Hypothetical questions, as they are more properly known, test your quick wit and your ability to decide on things right on the dot.

4. Leading questions

A lot of applicants fail miserably when answering this kind of question, for this is structured to be more like a "yes" or "no" question. Examples of this question begin with the phrases "Do you have the ability to...." and "Are you capable enough to..." Respond to this question by citing some examples on how you would demonstrate your skills. Also, try to say something about your goal plan once you get the job.

5. Multi-barreled questions

These are a string of questions that lead to the same topic, and they tend to get confusing. Feel free to ask your interviewer to repeat the questions, or at least rephrase them to give you a clearer picture of his or her inquiry. Some interviewers use multi-barreled questions to check your logical reasoning.

6. Behavioral questions

Try to recall some important experiences that made you a better person in terms of skills and social development. This allows the employer to evaluate how you would deal with different situations once you become part of the company.

The bottom line is, try your best to be straight and direct. Avoid using too many adjectives. Just say what's on your mind. After all, they are just asking questions. You provide the answers.

Find out what career options are available for you that matches your innate talents or interests.

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