Regulate Your Engine Temperature with Mercedes Thermostat

By: Dwyane Thomas

Before plunging in to something physically exhausting, we usually have the saying "warm-up first." The same is true with your car. Before it goes running, the engine needs to warm-up first. The engine does this with the aid of the thermostat.

The is basically a small device about two inches in diameter that is located between the engine and the radiator. It houses a temperature-sensitive valve which opens and closes based off coolant temperature.

Its main function is to act as the temperature regulator of your car's cooling system. It does this by blocking the flow of coolant to the radiator until the engine has warmed up. When the engine is cold, no coolant flows through the engine. The general operating temperature of an engine is about 200 degrees Fahrenheit, or 95 degrees Celsius. Once the engine reaches this, the thermostat opens. Hot coolant flows away from the engine and into the radiator to cool off. Seconds later, it returns to the engine to absorb more heat. By performing this function, the thermostat reduces engine wear, deposits and emissions.

But what lies beneath the Mercedes thermostat? Inside the thermostat is a small cylinder located on the engine-side of the device. This cylinder is filled with a wax that begins to melt at 180 degrees Fahrenheit. A rod connected to the valve presses into this wax. When the wax melts, it expands significantly and pushes the rod out of the cylinder, opening the valve. It is however important to note that different thermostats open at different temperatures.

Having a faulty Mercedes thermostat can pose more risks to your vehicle that you have ever imagined. Normally, small parts such as these are taken for granted. But once your thermostat fails, be ready for bigger problems, especially with your engine. If a thermostat fails, hot coolant becomes trapped inside the engine and quickly overheats. This will cause problems like low heater output, overheating, poor fuel economy, knocking or pinging when accelerating, high idle speed, an electric cooling fan that runs continuously, and low temperature gauge readings. It can even cause you to fail your emissions test.

To keep your fully functional, it is recommended to flush your radiator and to change your coolant twice a year. This may be the first step to prevent future engine damage repairs.

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