What are Micropipettes?

By: accumaximum

Micropipettes come in many sizes. The most commonly used micropipettes found in lab are the P-10, P-20, P-100, P-200, and P-1000. The number refers to the maximum volume (measured in microliters) that can be transferred. The plunger button or the body of the micropipette is marked with the minimum and maximum volume range (or on some brands, only the maximum volume is indicated. If the minimum volume limit is not indicated, it is generally 1/10th of the maximum volume limit.)

Micropipettes use a disposable plastic tip. This is the only part of the micropipette that actually comes in contact with the solution. The tips come in various sizes and colors. A color coding system between the micropipette and the tips used. Each size of micropipette uses a specific size tip.

Each type of micropipette can be used to transfer a specific range of volumes. NEVER dial the digital volume indicator past its minimum or maximum value because this will damage the micropipette.

How to Use a Micropipette:
1. Select the correct size micropipette and tips.
2. Dial the volume adjustment knob to set the proper volume in the digital volume indicator.
3. Place the tip securely on the micropipette.
4. Hold the micropipette vertically over the solution and push the plunger down to the first stop.
5. Insert the tip into the solution.
6. Slowly release the plunger and note that the solution is drawn into the tip.
7. Look at the tip to be sure that you do not have bubbles in the tip. (If bubbles exist, expel the solution and try again.)
8. Dispense the solution touching the tip to the side of the target container. Slowly depress the plunger to the second stop. Before releasing the plunger, remove tip from target container.
9. Be sure the tip is empty, then use the tip ejector to dispose of the tip into an appropriate disposal container.

Note: You must use a fresh tip for every transfer or you will contaminate your solutions!

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