How to upgrade CPU

By: Michael Cottier
Your CPU, also known as the Central Processing Unit, is basically the heart of your computer and without it we would be in the dark ages. Just like the human heart pumps blood throughout the body, your CPU pumps data through the computer and the corresponding parts that are inside of it. This is why your CPU can be a deal breaker when it comes to your computers speed. Not having enough processing power can cause your computer to not work properly and fail, and too much power is...well just a waste of money.

What you want to find is the right speed for you and the socket type for your computers mother board. Most people just buy a new computer when it becomes to slow, but they are wrong in doing so since a simple CPU upgrade will bring it back up to speed with current software and components. So before you go buying a new computer just for more speed, or hiring someone to upgrade your CPU for you, consider doing a CPU upgrade yourself. Now I know what you are thinking, "I know nothing about computers and I am afraid I will mess something up." Well no need to fret, your in the hands of an experienced computer expert who will teach you each step to remove your old CPU and install a new one.

First we need discuss what CPU you need to buy and the speed it should be. CPU's connect to your computers motherboard, which is basically the big circuit board in your computer that connects everything together.

Your CPU will sit inside of a socket, but what socket type you need is where it gets difficult. There are many different socket types and only two main CPU companies, Intel and AMD. If your computer is equipped with an Intel CPU, then you usually can only replace it with another Intel CPU, unless it is an old socket 7 which can support both. The socket types Intel uses are slot 1 for Pentium two and three chips, socket 370 for Celeron A's and socket 478 for Pentium 4's.

AMD uses slot A for Athlon's, socket 940 for 64 bit Opteron and Athlon multiple CPU motherboards, socket 939 for 64 bit Athlon's and socket 754, which is basically a cheaper socket for 64 bit Athlon's.

Now of course these are the current slot and socket types as I am writing this article, but of course technology is always advancing and in the future I assure you new types will come out.

Okay, so after all that you may be wondering how do I find out the slot or socket type that can be used in my computer? Well first I recommend you look at your computer or mother boards manual that came with it, and read about what socket type(s) it supports and what processors work best with it. If you don't have a manual, then I recommend you find out what processor is currently in your computer and match it with the correct socket type that I talked about above.

Since you have figured out the correct socket type for your new CPU, let's talk about speed. A processors speed can be measured in MHz or GHz, and GHz is the fastest. Processors that only go MHz are rarely found in computers these days, especially not new ones. The fact of the matter is that MHz processors just can't cut it for today's computer applications and operating systems. Plus, one thousand MHz equals one GHz, so you can see the huge speed difference between the two.

The amount of GHz speed you should get depends on what you will be using your computer for. If you plan on using your computer just for regular home use, like surfing the net, doing your taxes and other minor stuff, then you should just get a processor that is between 1 and 1.5 GHz. If you use a lot of programs, that require a lot of data processing, then you should get a processor that is around 2 GHz in speed. For all you computer gamers out there, I know you want something that will make your games load faster, play batter and look better, so I recommend you get a processor that is at least 3 GHz or maybe just a little less or more.

Well that concludes the first part of this article; in the second part we will discuss the removal of your old CPUFree Reprint Articles, and the installation of your new one.

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