Certified Hypnosis Instructions - Does it Really Work?

By: Timothy Croy

Hypnosis was once regarded as nothing more than a cheap stage trick. However, as research has proven, it has now become a powerful medical treatment, and it's even now available on the NHS.

For centuries, hypnosis has been used to treat a diversity of illnesses. However, it went into a steep decline with the introduction of medicine some 200 years ago. Recently it has been more associated with movie villains and stage magicians.

Things are once again changing. Long gone are the days of swaying watches, swinging pendulums, and counting backwards as the patient slumps into a state of unconsciousness. Magic stages or movie sets aside, hypnosis is now being recognized as a real medical treatment. It is increasingly being used to treat symptoms of conditions and diseases such as cystic fibrosis, asthma, snoring, warts, and even migraines.

It's also been used to allow pain-free childbirth, and dental work without anesthesia. New evidence also suggests that it's highly effective in treating irritable bowel syndrome and certain types of chest pain. American Hypnotherapy research centers are finding that more than half their clientele using hypnosis to stop smoking were able to kick the habit. Researchers in France are also finding success using hypnosis therapy to lower blood pressure.

Just how hypnosis works is unclear. Some critics believe it's simply way of relaxing. Doctors agree there's more to it, and that under a hypnotic state, the patient can concentrate intensely on a specific feeling, thought, memory, or sensation while blocking out common distractions.

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