Structured Settlements

By: Max Bellamy

A structured settlement is an arrangement with the insurance company that involves periodic payments obtained as a substitute for release of liability. As indicated, structured settlements are often obtained as a result of lawsuits and are an excellent alternative for lump sum settlements. Structured settlements are usually to be paid from the gross income to the injured party or as workers compensation settlement by the company against which the case has been filed.

Structured settlements are often not very helpful when there is a need for immediate cash, but a part or whole of them can be sold in case of a monetary emergency. People often wish to exchange these for a lump sum that would be readily available during an emergency. Even with such drawbacks, structured settlements are still popular because the procedure usually benefits both the parties involved in an accident or an injury.

Structured settlements are best suited for cases involving minors. To choose the structured settlement option, there is certain minimum amount of procedure that has to be followed. Also, settlements that may have the possibility of being postponed to an indefinite period of time can also opt for the structured settlements instead. Since the payments would be made periodically, they would be a best option unless in cases of financial emergency.

Many countries such as the United States, Canada, Australia, and England have employed the structured settlements strategy as part of the tort law. However, the law might be defined and interpreted in different ways in different countries and the rules definitely change as per the tort law in that particular country. In spite of the differences structured settlements have requirements for the income tax and spendthrift according to the tort law in all the countries.

Before signing for a structured settlementFeature Articles, it would be wise to consider the effect of this settlement on the existing medical insurance. Structured settlements might prove to be a hindrance if not considered from all angles before the entering into an agreement with the other party or company.

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