CPU Upgrading Tips

By: Michael Cottier
Now that we have talked about what CPU you should get, next is the removal and installation process of upgrading your CPU. First you need to shut down your computer completely, unplug all cables connected to it, and lay it out in an open workspace, preferably a wood table. You also will need a Philips and flathead screw driver and before you open your computer or anything, be sure to touch a metal surface to ground yourself and avoid any static electricity.

With everything ready to go, unscrew or slide off your computers case cover to get a look inside of your computer. Once you can see inside, you will see your motherboard, which is the big circuit board in the middle that connects every part together. When you look at the motherboard, kind of near the middle or top left, you will see a square with a metal heatsink and a fan on top of it. This is your CPU and the first thing you need to do is remove the heatsink. This is a very tricky and risky part of upgrading your CPU, since the heat sink is very securely fastened on top of your CPU. What you need to do first is unhook the fan's power. To do this you just need to find the wire that is going from the fan to the motherboard and unplug it. Then after that please study the heat sink latching mechanism and unlatch it. Some heat sink latches are different, so that is why I cannot give you a detailed description on how to unhook it.

When unlatching the heatsink you want to be sure to not scratch the motherboard or even touch it with your screwdriver.

It may be hard, but you cannot do this or your motherboard most likely will not work anymore. This is why many people are scared to do it there selves, but I assure you, if you take it slow and exercise caution you will do just fine.

After you heatsink is gone and your CPU is showing, you will be able to remove it. To do this, you just have to lift the locking lever up (vertical) then just get a grip of the CPU and lift it up and out of its socket. CPU sockets and slots since the 1990's use zero force insertion, which means the CPU just sits in there and no force is required to install or uninstall it.

Now that your old CPU has been taken out you can put a new one in. First just make sure that the locking latch is in the up position ready for your new CPU. Now that you are ready you can insert your new CPU.

Processors are fragile, so when you do this do not try to cram it in there. Just remember that CPU's use zero force for insertion, so you just need to lay your CPU in there. Before you do though you need to find out which way you need to lay it. Every CPU has a notch on one of the corners and needs to match up to the point where the CPU holder has a notch. Then when the CPU is in place, properly, you can now push the locking latch back down.

Next you need to put the heatsink back on top of it, but first you need to locate your CPU's die and put the thermal compound that came with your CPU. Your CPU's die is the grayish looking square that is dead center on top of your CPU. After your thermal compound is properly applied, you are ready to put the heatsink on. Make sure the heatsink is facing the correct direction, and then gently sit it on top of the CPU. The thermal compound will cushion your CPU between the heatsink so no need to worry about scratching it.

Now is the tricky part all over again, latching your heat sink back on. Just like you unlatched it to remove your CPU, you need to do the opposite to latch it back on. As I said before, take your time and exercise caution when doing this so you don’t scratch your mother board.

Now just hook the CPU fans power back up by plugging the power wire back into the correct spot on your motherboard, where it was before. This is easy because usually the hookup spot on your mother board is labeled "CPU FAN" and is located right next to the CPU's location.

Finally you should check over your work and make sure the heatsink is securely fastened, all wires are secured, and everything looks good. If all is goodPsychology Articles, then put your case cover back on and screw it in. Then you can hook all of your computer cables back up again and power on your computer. Dust off your hands and pat yourself on the back because you have just completed your first CPU upgrade.

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