Flexible Server

By: Jesse Miller

The Company Liquid computing obtained a sponsorship f $14 million to create a flexible sever based on AMD's Opteron processor and an Unix operating system.

The company, with deep roots in telecommunications and base server industry, has created a design available for customers that want servers with increased performances since 2006.
They are hoping that the flexibility and expansibility of their design will later attract customers from the business-computing area.

The product is a system called STL-20X4. It has 37 inch height, so it's space effective as it is just half the size of the standard server rack. In the middle it has 20 electronic panels named calculus modules that are connected to amid-plane channel. Each module has four AMD Opteron processors, the dual-core model that combines two processing engines on the on the same silicon piece. The AMD processors have also been utilized by the company Kealia.

Regarding the server design, the crucial thing is it's technology that allows the four-chip modules to be attached in order to form big micro-processor servers or to be kept separately for smaller simultaneous activities.

Furthermore, the multiple systems can be brought together with the help of communication wires so that the users can get even bigger servers. The company foresees a machine that will have four servers, with no less than 320 Opteron processors. The design can be brought to any level the end-users choose to, from four to thousands of processors. This expansion is possible because there are very short communication delays between the transmitting wires, that range from one to maximum two milliseconds.

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