Booting to a Linux Desktop

By: Clyde Boom

To learn Linux concepts and get Linux training that you can understand, you need to understand Linux terms - the Linux "lingo".

Articles with names ending in "Linux Concepts & Terms", have been created to help you learn Linux "geek-speak" (terms) - and this will help you learn how to use Linux!

Booting Linux to a Linux Desktop

As a new Linux user, the easiest way to work with Linux is by booting to a Linux desktop. A Linux desktop provides an easy method of running Linux software programs, by double-clicking on icons or using menus on the desktop.

A Linux desktop also allows you to easily open a terminal emulation window to run Linux commands.

Using a Linux Terminal (Terminal Emulation Window)

A terminal emulation window is also referred to as a "Linux terminal", "Linux console" or just "terminal" or "console".

Linux Tips: When you are new to Linux, use a version of Linux that has a desktop installed and that boots to the Linux desktop.

Many Linux servers are set up to simply boot to a Linux console Login: prompt - and not a Linux desktop.

To run Linux administration commands, you need to work as the root user. However, for security reasons, you should never log in to a Linux desktop as the root user.

Working as the Root User to Do Linux System Administration Tasks

To work as the root user from a Linux desktop: log in to the desktop as a regular user, open a terminal emulation window and run the su command, with the - (dash) option.

Now imagine watching a Linux video tutorial that shows you how to: log in to a Linux desktop, open a terminal emulation window on the desktop to run Linux commands - and explains why you use these different methods of getting to the Linux command line prompt.

You can watch a friendly, easy, step-by-stepComputer Technology Articles, presentation that shows you all you need to know - explaining all the Linux concepts and terms along the way - easy Linux training all the way!

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