Fishing for Channel Catfish

By: Daniel Eggertsen

Channel catfish are one of the most plentiful varieties of catfish within the North American continent and as such, they are easily found, though not always as easy to catch. Channel catfish fishing can be done through various methods.

Because it is such a large sport and these fish have been around in heavy numbers for a long time, there are hundreds of techniques, tips and strategies that you can use to catch your cat. The key is to take some time to examine what will work for your region, your skill level and for the amount of fishing you plan to do. Here are some tips for channel catfish.

Who Are These Creatures?

Channel catfish are found throughout the United States, as they are that popular. They do go by various names, though. They are called spotted cats, river catfish, and sometimes blue channel catfish, too. Some of these fish are spotted and others look a lot like their larger cousins the blue catfish. What's more, many do enjoy rivers over lakes.

With that said, do not assume that the only place that you can find these fish is in the river. They are not overly fussy about where they live. They are usually found in warm waters, about 70 degrees or higher during the middle of spring throughout their spawning season. You can find this type of catfish throughout various freshwater locations.

Catfish Habits

Fishing for channel catfish is something to enjoy doing, but can be difficult if you are unaware of a few things about these fish. For example, they do like rivers over other types of locations, but they do not like to stay in any location with a heavy current flowing.

They do like to find a large natural pile up and use it for a bit of shelter. They do this with the ridges of the river and rock formations that they find too. This is unlike larger catfish that enjoy the current as their favorite location.

If you are fishing for channel catfish in lakes, look in the shallow end of the water first. You will usually find them lurking near the shoreline under the brush and overgrowth there from trees or grasses. These make for excellent shelter for them. Also, avoid locations that have a very muddy bottom.

The channel catfish is more likely to be found in sand and rock bottom locations instead. Alternatively, look for them just below dams, as good channel catfish can be found in many of these locations. Here the first is after the plentiful flotsam and jetsam that will work well as feed.

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