Choosing an Office Printer

By: Robert Camp

Even though the modern office increasingly relies on computer and online based distribution of documents, there is still much demand for a printed copies of documents for most businesses. Legal documents, contracts, reports and other such materials still need to be printed so it is important that a business has a printer that is capable of handling the work load of the office while being economical for the business to use.

The first step in choosing a printer for your office is to assess the printing needs of your business. Does the company produce a large volume of printed materials? Will the printer need to be part of a network? IS there a need for colour or high quality photo printing? Will you need to print on paper larger than A4?

These are the main questions that need to be asked to ascertain what type of printer is most suitable for your office. There are other considerations to take into account but these would be more of a matter of looking at the spec of the printer rather what type of printer it is.

Generally speaking, for a small business with small print needs such as monthly client reports, occasional scanning and maybe fax functionality, a will suffice. As the business grows, this printer may need to be replaced but multifunction printers are inexpensive yet produce good quality prints. A printer of this sort would be inappropriate for a large company as they cannot handle heavy print loads.

Companies that have a need for a printer that can produce high volumes of printed documents economically should look into buying a office laser printer. These printers are generally more robust than multifunctional machines due to the fact that they contain less plastic parts. The cost of these printers will be more but the overall cost drops as office laser printers rely on a toner cartridge to produce the prints rather than an expensive printer cartridges. A good monochrome laser printer can produce approximately one thousand pages with one toner cartridge.

An important aspect of a laser printer is it's paper feed capacity. That is, the amount of p[aper the paper loading tray can hold. If you have a busy office with printing constantly occuring throughout the working day, you will want to make sure that the tray holds at least 250 sheets or even better, a printer that has two trays so that different sizes of paper can be loaded as and when needed without having to manually change the paper type. Additionally, if you are planning to use the printer to print large or finely detailed documents, the amount of memory that the printer has should also be a consideration. The more memory the printer has, the easier printing large documents will be.

For offices with a computer network, having a printer that can connect to that network would be the most sensible option. Most modern printers have a function to be connected to a network so that multiple computers can access and print from the central office printer but if you have a large office network such as a business that has a call centre, you will want to look into buying a network laser printer that can handle all the needs of the employees in your company. Printers of this type can connect to local area networks (LAN), handle various types of paper and have a typical print speed of between 15 to 30 pages per minute.

Businesses that need colour printing and art/photography printing facilities should consider buying a high quality that is dedicated to specific jobs. use this printer for printing fine quality or colour materials and then have a monochrome printer for handling text and lower quality materials.

Also, for photography printing, photo cartridges can be bought that work much more effectively with high-gloss photo paper. are another alternative to consider. Though the use of inkjet printers has declined with the advent of colour laser printers, the quality of colour printing from an inkjet printer can deem it a worthwhile investment.

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